“Any Day Now” Chuck Jackson

Any Day Now” is a popular song written by Burt Bacharach and Bob Hilliard in 1962. It has been recorded by numerous artists over the years, including… Read more ““Any Day Now” Chuck Jackson”

“Mother-in-Law” Ernie K-Do

ORIGINALLY POSTED ON: MissBackInTheDayUS

“Mother-in-Law” is a 1961 song recorded by Ernie K-Doe. It song was a number-one hit in the U.S. on both the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B charts. The song was written and produced by Allen Toussaint who also played the piano solo. It was issued by Minit Records.

After several unsuccessful takes, Allen Toussaint balled the composition up and threw it away as he was leaving the room. One of the backup singers, Willie Hopper, thought that it was such a good song that he convinced Ernie K-Doe to calm down and give it one more try.

Other versions

The 65 album, Big Beat Sounds by The Newbeats.

Jello Biafra released a live cover of the song as part of his 2015 album, Walk on Jindal’s Splinters.

Herman’s Hermits released a version on their first U.S.,LP. Wiki

Harry Nilsson Without You 1972 HD

The Badfinger original wasn’t released as a single, so most people weren’t familiar with it. Nilsson’s version, laced with lush orchestration, became a huge hit, climbing to #1 US in February 1972 and staying for four weeks. Nilsson was known as a songwriter and wrote most of the songs he recorded, but two of his biggest hits were covers: “Without You” and “Everybody’s Talkin’.”

“Without You” is not the kind of song Nilsson, who died in 1994, would have written. His compositions were far more acerbic, and he took pains to avoid the topic of love (or lack of it).

Nilsson first came across this song at a Laurel Canyon party in 1971 and thought it was a Beatles song. Badfinger was signed to Apple Records, The Beatles’ label, and their version of “Without You” was produced by Beatles associates Geoff Emerick and Mal Evans.

Nilsson also had a Beatles connection: John Lennon helped launch his career when he referred to Harry as his “favorite American group.” He and Lennon enjoyed a destructive time together from 1973-1975 that became known as the “lost weekend.”

Nilsson’s version added an orchestra and gave the song a dramatic production. When Nilsson recorded it, he initially played the song slow and dark, accompanied only by piano.

Producer Richard Perry recalled to Mojo magazine April 2008 that he had to persuade an unwilling Nilsson to record it as a big ballad: “I had to force him to take a shot with the rhythm section. Even while we were doing it, he’d be saying to the musicians, ‘This song’s awful.'” Songfacts.com