Dave Koz “MOONRIVER” saxophone (cover)

Dave Koz is a poetic saxophonist. His magical sounds become a signatured art as he plays “Moon River”, a song co-written an produced by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer.

Koz was originally a rock musician before he moved to smooth jazz in 1989. For the rest of the 1980s, Koz served as a session musician in several rock bands, and toured with Jeff Lorber. He was recruited as a member of Bobby Caldwell’s tour.

Koz was also a member of Richard Marx’s band and toured with Marx throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s, which was around the time he recurred as the guest saxophonist on the syndicated late-night talk show The Arsenio Hall Show.

He also played in the house band of CBS’ short-lived The Pat Sajak Show, with Tom Scott as bandleader.

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Autumn Leaves|Cannonball Adderly


The son of a jazz cornetist, Adderley had directed a high school band in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, studied at the U.S. Navy School of Music, and led two army bands before moving to New York City in the mid-1950s. In the summer of 1955, Adderley attracted attention within New York jazz circles, garnering rave reviews for his performances with bassist Oscar Pettiford at the Café Bohemia.

He soon thereafter formed a quintet with his brother Nat, a noted cornetist, that met with little success—although recordings made by the group received considerable praise years later. In 1957 Adderley embarked upon an 18-month stint with trumpeter Miles Davis, which proved to be one of the most fertile and creative periods in the careers of both men.

Playing in Davis’s sextet alongside saxophone legend John Coltrane, Adderley favoured a busy style that contrasted well with Davis’s spare understatement. Adderley was prominently featured on Davis’s albums Milestones (1958) and Kind of Blue (1959), both considered benchmarks of 1950s hard bop and modal jazz.

Also significant was Somethin’ Else (1958), a classic album released under Adderley’s own name on which Davis was a guest player. In 1959 Adderley again joined with brother Nat to form a quintet, this time successfully, and he continued to lead popular small groups for the remainder of his career.

Adderley was first acclaimed as a stylistic heir to Charlie Parker, although the more traditional Benny Carter’s rhythm-and-blues phrasing also inspired his music. Although his music was not regarded as particularly groundbreaking, Adderley was an extremely gifted musician technically, known for an improvisational style that featured restless, highly decorated, often florid lines; emphatic blues harmonies; and a full, rich tone.

As jazz became more atonally obtuse and rhythmically complex during the 1960s, Adderley’s straightforward approach helped keep jazz popular with mainstream audiences. His was “happy music, and none the worse for that,” according to one critic. Commons

“Dream A Little Dream Of Me” The Royal Vienna Sax and Orchestra

“Dream a Little Dream of Me”, will remain a classic unless we stop dreaming and stop loving.

is a 1931 song with music by Fabian Andre and Wilbur Schwandt and lyrics by Gus Kahn. It was first recorded in February 1931 by Ozzie Nelson and also by Wayne King and His Orchestra, with vocals by Ernie Birchill. A popular standard, it has seen more than 60 other versions recorded, with one of the highest chart ratings by The Mamas & The Papas in 1968 with Cass Elliot on lead vocals.


Funeral Flowers

“Dream a Little Dream of Me” was recorded by Ozzie Nelson and his Orchestra, with vocal by Nelson, on February 16, 1931, for Brunswick Records. Two days later, Wayne King and His Orchestra, with vocal by Ernie Birchill, recorded the song for Victor Records. “Dream a Little Dream of Me” was also an early signature tune of Kate Smith.

In summer 1950, seven recordings of “Dream a Little Dream of Me” were in release, with the versions by Frankie Laine and Jack Owens reaching the US top 20 at respectively numbers 18 and 14: the other versions were by Cathy Mastice, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Jordan, Vaughn Monroe, Dinah Shore and a duet by Bob Crosby and Georgia Gibbs. Other traditional pop acts to record “Dream a Little Dream of Me” include Louis Armstrong, Barbara Carroll, Nat King Cole, Doris Day, Joni James, and Dean Martin.

The song was again recorded in 1968 by Mama Cass Elliot with The Mamas & the Papas, and then by Anita Harris. More than 40 other versions followed, including by the Mills Brothers, Sylvie Vartan, Henry Mancini, The Beautiful South, Anne Murray, Erasure, Michael Bublé, Tony DeSare, and Italian vocal group Blue Penguin (see below: List of recorded versions). Wiki