Smashed Blackbean Quesadilla

Ingredients: (For 2 quesadillas) -1 can black beans -1/4 cup chopped tomato -1/4 cup vegan shredded cheddar -1/4 cup chopped bell pepper (used a mix …

Smashed Blackbean Quesadilla
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Unforgettable (Duet with Nat King Cole)

The record was very successful in the Pop, Jazz, and R&B markets and was considered the major comeback recording that had been brewing since Cole’s late 1980s releases. The album was certified 7x platinum as of 2009 by the RIAA. The album won the 1992 Grammy Awards for Album of the Year and Best Engineered – Non-Classical, while the track “Unforgettable” (duet with her father Nat King Cole) won four additional Grammys: Record of the Year, Traditional Pop Vocal Performance, Song of the Year and Arrangement Accompanying Vocals. The album also won Soul Train Music Award for Best R&B/Soul Album, Female the same year.

Two albums prior to this one (1987’s Everlasting and 1989’s Good to Be Back) also moved to Elektra after Cole signed with the label. Her uncle Ike Cole plays piano on the album.

As of 2016 the album has sold 6.2 million copies in the United States according to Nielsen Music.[

BELIEVE | Elton John

Believe” was a chart success. It reached number one in Iceland, Italy and Canada, becoming John’s eighteenth number-one single in the latter country (see Elton John singles discography). In the United States, “Believe” became John’s fifteenth number one on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart[1] and peaked at number 13 on the Billboard Hot 100; it gave him his third straight top-twenty single in the US. In Europe, it was a top-twenty hit in France, Poland, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Wallonia region of Belgium.

The music video for the song was entirely in black-and-white and shot in London, featuring shots of the title screen in the beginning and end of the video. Wiki

Autumn Leaves|Cannonball Adderly


The son of a jazz cornetist, Adderley had directed a high school band in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, studied at the U.S. Navy School of Music, and led two army bands before moving to New York City in the mid-1950s. In the summer of 1955, Adderley attracted attention within New York jazz circles, garnering rave reviews for his performances with bassist Oscar Pettiford at the Café Bohemia.

He soon thereafter formed a quintet with his brother Nat, a noted cornetist, that met with little success—although recordings made by the group received considerable praise years later. In 1957 Adderley embarked upon an 18-month stint with trumpeter Miles Davis, which proved to be one of the most fertile and creative periods in the careers of both men.

Playing in Davis’s sextet alongside saxophone legend John Coltrane, Adderley favoured a busy style that contrasted well with Davis’s spare understatement. Adderley was prominently featured on Davis’s albums Milestones (1958) and Kind of Blue (1959), both considered benchmarks of 1950s hard bop and modal jazz.

Also significant was Somethin’ Else (1958), a classic album released under Adderley’s own name on which Davis was a guest player. In 1959 Adderley again joined with brother Nat to form a quintet, this time successfully, and he continued to lead popular small groups for the remainder of his career.

Adderley was first acclaimed as a stylistic heir to Charlie Parker, although the more traditional Benny Carter’s rhythm-and-blues phrasing also inspired his music. Although his music was not regarded as particularly groundbreaking, Adderley was an extremely gifted musician technically, known for an improvisational style that featured restless, highly decorated, often florid lines; emphatic blues harmonies; and a full, rich tone.

As jazz became more atonally obtuse and rhythmically complex during the 1960s, Adderley’s straightforward approach helped keep jazz popular with mainstream audiences. His was “happy music, and none the worse for that,” according to one critic. Commons

The Look Of Love | Dusty Springfield

“The Look of Love” is a popular song composed by Burt Bacharach and Hal David and sung by English pop singer Dusty Springfield. The song is notable for it’s sensuality and its relaxed bossa nova rhythm.

The song was featured in the 1967 spoof James Bond film Casino Royale. In 2008, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. It also received a Best Song nomination in the 1968 Academy Awards.